‘You Wouldn’t Think the Ashes of a Man Would Be So Heavy’: Remembering Sam Shepard

There is a link to read The New Yorker story. Please do. It is excellent. I always admired this man’s writing and enjoyed his acting.

Longreads

Broadway World reports today that Oscar-nominated actor and Pulitzer-winning playwright Sam Shepard has died at 73 of complications from ALS, AKA Lou Gherig’s disease.

In recent years, Shepard was best known as an actor, in the last few years appearing as the Rayburn family patriarch in the Netflix drama Bloodline. But he was a prolific, ground-breaking playwright, and a key player in the Off-Broadway movement of the ’60s and ’70s. According to The New York Times, Shepard won a Pulitzer in 1979 for The Curse of the Starving Class, and received nominations for two others, True West, and Fool for Love.

His work examined toxic masculinity at a time when that was rare. The son of an alcoholic farmer, he explored male aggression as it is often passed down from fathers to sons. In 2010, critic John Lahr touched on this in a profile…

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About Henrietta Handy

I am a Kentucky mountain girl far from home, perhaps far from the girl years. I am an aspiring writer with a wonderful husband who puts up with this writing and reading addiction I have. He also puts up with all of the yarn and knitting. I have four canine children and a ton of friends I love dearly. I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the age of 2 1/2 and have still managed to have a good life despite all the pain. So, I invite you to join me in this journey and just possibly have fun along the way.
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One Response to ‘You Wouldn’t Think the Ashes of a Man Would Be So Heavy’: Remembering Sam Shepard

  1. Rebecca L. Proudfoot says:

    I enjoyed the New Yorker article. He was a son of Kentucy. So many men came home with PTSD after WWii before we had a name for it. Even with a name it dominates families, generation after generation.

    Like

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